Clip the dog's nails.[3] If left untrimmed, a dog's nails can curl under into the paw pads or twist toes in a way that causes joint damage. To keep your dog's nails short, clip them regularly, depending on how fast his nails grow. If you can hear his nails on the ground when he walks, that means his nails are touching the ground, and are too long. [4]


Wolves kill dogs wherever they are found together.[111] One study reported that in Wisconsin in 1999 more compensation had been paid for losses due to wolves taking dogs than for wolves taking livestock. In Wisconsin wolves will often kill hunting dogs, possibly because the dogs are in the wolf's territory.[111] A strategy has been reported in Russia where one wolf lures a dog into heavy brush where another wolf waits in ambush.[112] In some instances, wolves have displayed an uncharacteristic fearlessness of humans and buildings when attacking dogs, to the extent that they have to be beaten off or killed.[113] Although the numbers of dogs killed each year are relatively low, it induces a fear of wolves entering villages and farmyards to take dogs, and losses of dogs to wolves has led to demands for more liberal wolf hunting regulations.[108]
Show Stopping Style grooms dogs and cats in your home. I can kindly introduce puppies and kittens to brushing, clipping, blow drying, and having their nails done! They feel more secure staying home, and pet parents can be right there! I grind dog and puppy nails to avoid splintering and to make soft paws, and use gentle, all natural, species appropriate shampoo and ear cleaner. If you'd rather I take your pet to a nearby facility, only the cost of the facility will be extra. ... View Profile

Wolves kill dogs wherever they are found together.[111] One study reported that in Wisconsin in 1999 more compensation had been paid for losses due to wolves taking dogs than for wolves taking livestock. In Wisconsin wolves will often kill hunting dogs, possibly because the dogs are in the wolf's territory.[111] A strategy has been reported in Russia where one wolf lures a dog into heavy brush where another wolf waits in ambush.[112] In some instances, wolves have displayed an uncharacteristic fearlessness of humans and buildings when attacking dogs, to the extent that they have to be beaten off or killed.[113] Although the numbers of dogs killed each year are relatively low, it induces a fear of wolves entering villages and farmyards to take dogs, and losses of dogs to wolves has led to demands for more liberal wolf hunting regulations.[108]

Do you have a dog that you get groomed regularly? If you do, you’ve probably wondered how much — or even if — you’re supposed to tip your dog groomer. Treat your dog groomer as you would your own hair stylist. A 15 percent to 20 percent tip is an appropriate amount to show your appreciation for a dog grooming job well done. If your dog didn’t get clean or their nails didn’t get properly clipped, then you certainly don’t have to tip. But if you’re satisfied with the service, consider the tip part of the standard dog grooming price, and just plan it into your dog care budget so you’ll have a happy groomer and a well-groomed dog. Here are a few examples of when you should tip extra:


Brush the dog's teeth.[2] Ideally, brushing your dog’s teeth every day with dog toothpaste is the route to healthy teeth and gums. Use dog toothpaste instead of human products, so you don't poison your dog with fluoride. If there is any chance that you may get bitten by your dog, do NOT attempt to brush your pet’s teeth. At any point, if the dog gets overwhelmed, give him a break to calm down.
Please note that regardless of pet type, we always put safety first. Sometimes pets can stress in new situations. If we feel your pet is too stressed or showing any potential health concern, we may opt to conclude the grooming appointment in order to do what's best for them. Your stylist can help recommend a grooming service for a smooth introduction, such as a Mini Make-Rover. For any potential health concern your stylist will refer you to your veterinarian.
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