^ vonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Shuldiner, Emily; Koch, Ilana Janowitz; Kartzinel, Rebecca Y.; Hogan, Andrew; Brubaker, Lauren; Wanser, Shelby; Stahler, Daniel; Wynne, Clive D.L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Udell, Monique A.R. (1 July 2017). "Structural variants in genes associated with human Williams-Beuren syndrome underlie stereotypical hypersociability in domestic dogs". Science Advances. 3 (7): e1700398. Bibcode:2017SciA....3E0398V. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1700398. PMC 5517105. PMID 28776031.
Where the domestication of the dog took place remains debated, with the most plausible proposals spanning Western Europe,[9][28] Central Asia[28][29] and East Asia.[28][30] This has been made more complicated by the recent proposal that an initial wolf population split into East and West Eurasian groups. These two groups, before going extinct, were domesticated independently into two distinct dog populations between 14,000 and 6,400 years ago. The Western Eurasian dog population was gradually and partially replaced by East Asian dogs introduced by humans at least 6,400 years ago.[28][2] This proposal is also debated.[2]
In 1758, the Swedish botanist and zoologist Carl Linnaeus published in his Systema Naturae the binomial nomenclature – or the two-word naming – of species. Canis is the Latin word meaning "dog",[21] and under this genus he listed the dog-like carnivores including domestic dogs, wolves, and jackals. He classified the domestic dog as Canis familiaris, and on the next page he classified the wolf as Canis lupus.[3] Linnaeus considered the dog to be a separate species from the wolf because of its cauda recurvata - its upturning tail which is not found in any other canid.[22]
Neutering reduces problems caused by hypersexuality, especially in male dogs.[76] Spayed female dogs are less likely to develop some forms of cancer, affecting mammary glands, ovaries, and other reproductive organs.[77] However, neutering increases the risk of urinary incontinence in female dogs,[78] and prostate cancer in males,[79] as well as osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, cruciate ligament rupture, obesity, and diabetes mellitus in either sex.[80]
In 1758, the Swedish botanist and zoologist Carl Linnaeus published in his Systema Naturae the binomial nomenclature – or the two-word naming – of species. Canis is the Latin word meaning "dog",[21] and under this genus he listed the dog-like carnivores including domestic dogs, wolves, and jackals. He classified the domestic dog as Canis familiaris, and on the next page he classified the wolf as Canis lupus.[3] Linnaeus considered the dog to be a separate species from the wolf because of its cauda recurvata - its upturning tail which is not found in any other canid.[22]
Rinse your dog thoroughly. As long as you see dirt or soap bubbles in the water coming off of an area, keep rinsing. You can use the same method you used to soak the dog's coat before shampooing. If your dog is too afraid of running water or the bath in general and can't be done on your own, there are veterinarians who can give proper sedation, not too much, to allow you to groom in a couple of hours or can groom the dog themselves. Touch the dog all over to feel for any shampoo especially the chest area and in between the legs they are hard to get. To test it, rub the fur in between you fingers and pull softly, if it feels squeaky then it's clean.

Dogs have been described as carnivores[117][118] or omnivores.[17][119][120][121] Compared to wolves, dogs have genes involved in starch digestion that contribute to an increased ability to thrive on a starch-rich diet.[19] Based on metabolism and nutrition, many consider the dog to be an omnivore. However, the dog is not simply an omnivore. More like the cat and less like other omnivores, the dog can only produce bile acid with taurine, and it cannot produce vitamin D, which it obtains from animal flesh. Also more like the cat, the dog requires arginine to maintain its nitrogen balance. These nutritional requirements place the dog part-way between carnivores and omnivores.[122]

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In the United States, cats and dogs are a factor in more than 86,000 falls each year.[183] It has been estimated around 2% of dog-related injuries treated in UK hospitals are domestic accidents. The same study found that while dog involvement in road traffic accidents was difficult to quantify, dog-associated road accidents involving injury more commonly involved two-wheeled vehicles.[184]
Dog grooming prices for nail trims can vary based on the the size and temperament of your dog, where the nail trimming takes place, and whether you bundle the trim with other grooming services. The average cost to get your dog’s nails trimmed usually ranges from approximately $10 to $25. Nationally, the average for dog grooming prices is $60-$80, which usually encompasses not only nail trimming but also bathing, haircuts and other services.
Need to find Professional Dog Grooming Near Me service? Search dog grooming directory to find the best local dog groomer right now.Finding professional dog groomers in your area has now become easier with the help of dog grooming near me directory. Turn on the location on your mobile phone and approve the "track location" dialog. Once your location has been detected in the search field, all you got to do then is press the search button to find professional dog groomers in your area.Toggle Filters Keywords  Location   Radius: 10 km    Filter by type: Dog Groomers  SearchFeatured Dog Groomers ListingsHow to find a professional dog groomer near youhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlKggayDYmoRandom Dog GroomersBecause everyone dog groomer deservers a chance to be discoveredEvery Dog or Puppy Deserves the Best Grooming PossibleA well-groomed dog looks fresh, calm, and happy. This is what you should aim for when you book a dog grooming appointment for your buddy. Your dog should be groomed every once in a while for beauty and health reasons too. Finding a caring and reliable pet groomer is, therefore, essential. All the dog groomers in Dog Grooming Near Me are qualified pet pamper experts who are not just reference-able but well established in the dog grooming field too. Dog Grooming Near Me is here to ensure that you make an informed decision when looking for the best dog grooming expert near you.Our detailed directory will help you locate professional local dog groomers. You can even read customer reviews and see what other fellow dog owners think about dog grooming services in your locality.Why register your business on our dog grooming near me directory?The right question should be why not? Dog Grooming Near Me gives you the exposure your dog grooming service deserves. Take advantage of our website to reach even more customers looking for dog groomers like you. Collect awesome reviews about your grooming service while providing potential clients with useful information about your location, working hours, and even allow customers to share and recommend your great service to other people on social media. Start now.Do you own a Dog Grooming Service?Let the world know about your great dog grooming service and reach thousands of customers by registering your service in our dog grooming near me directory. You have nothing to lose. Submit your dog grooming listing today. Create your account  And submit your grooming salon in minutes to spread your salon or grooming service awarness out to people looking for dog groomers. #listify_call_to_action-2 .call-to-action{color:#fff;background-color:#181818}#listify_call_to_action-2:after{background-color:#181818}#listify_call_to_action-2 .cta-description p,#listify_call_to_action-2 .cta-subtext{color:#fff}News and UpdatesWhy not read something while you are at it.  September 2, 2017 • Dogs, General A Guide for First-Time Pet Owners: Choosing and Preparing for Your PetOwning a pet is a rewarding experience that comes with a lot of responsibility. While… Read More  October 7, 2016 • Dogs Is this the fastest most professional treat catcher?Hello fellow pet owners. Just like you we have some spare free time and well… Read More  February 22, 2016 • Dogs Dogs That Don’t Shed – the Dream of Every Dog FanDogs That Don’t Shed – the Dream of Every Dog Fan Dogs are adorable creatures… Read MoreView Blog Copyright Dog Grooming Near Me © 2019. All Rights ReservedRefund PolicyTerms of ServicefacebookGoogle + 

  • According to statistics published by the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association in the National Pet Owner Survey in 2009–2010, it is estimated there are 77.5 million people with pet dogs in the United States.[152] The same survey shows nearly 40% of American households own at least one dog, of which 67% own just one dog, 25% two dogs and nearly 9% more than two dogs. There does not seem to be any gender preference among dogs as pets, as the statistical data reveal an equal number of female and male dog pets. Yet, although several programs are ongoing to promote pet adoption, less than a fifth of the owned dogs come from a shelter.
    Pet Love is a unique concept of mobile grooming performed at the pet owners’ address. Pet Love encompasses a fleet of more than 50 fully equipped mobile grooming salons and a staff of professional, experienced groomers operating in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. In 2017, Pet Love celebrated its 40th year of business tending to the grooming needs of DFW metroplex pet owners at their residences. With more than 50,000 groomings per year, Pet Love keeps your cats and dogs beautiful and healthy!
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