"While new to thumbtack, we have over 20 years of experience, a 5 star rating online & we're reasonably priced! Background: Our founder grew up around street dogs, aggressive dogs, and so-called dangerous breeds. And has been around dogs for more than 20 years and understands them (and other animals) better than he understands people. His core values, which are apart of the company are: Value, Respect, Compassion, Integrity & Love We can help you train your pup, exercise them, housebreak them and teach you basic tactics to overcome their basic behavioral issues. We have experience with rottweilers, German shepherds, pit-bulls and other large breeds. I believe there are no bad dogs, just bad manners trained into them by accident. We love playing with them, roughhousing with them and teaching them things. Here is a free pro-tip; dogs love being scratched where they can't reach. The favorite location is the back of their hind legs, base of the spine on their back (in between the shoulder blades), & the base of the tail... BUT, you have to scratch very, very hard. Be forewarned, they will forever greet you with their rear facing you. :)"
Dogs generally have brown eyes and wolves almost always have amber or light colored eyes.[49] The skin of domestic dogs tends to be thicker than that of wolves, with some Inuit tribes favoring the former for use as clothing due to its greater resistance to wear and tear in harsh weather.[50] The paws of a dog are half the size of those of a wolf, and their tails tend to curl upwards, another trait not found in wolves.[51] The dog has developed into hundreds of varied breeds, and shows more behavioral and morphological variation than any other land mammal.[52]
The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris when considered a subspecies of the wolf or Canis familiaris when considered a distinct species)[5] is a member of the genus Canis (canines), which forms part of the wolf-like canids,[6] and is the most widely abundant terrestrial carnivore.[7][8][9][10][11] The dog and the extant gray wolf are sister taxa[12][13][14] as modern wolves are not closely related to the wolves that were first domesticated,[13][14] which implies that the direct ancestor of the dog is extinct.[15] The dog was the first species to be domesticated[14][16] and has been selectively bred over millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes.[17]
Pet Love is a unique concept of mobile grooming performed at the pet owners’ address. Pet Love encompasses a fleet of more than 50 fully equipped mobile grooming salons and a staff of professional, experienced groomers operating in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. In 2017, Pet Love celebrated its 40th year of business tending to the grooming needs of DFW metroplex pet owners at their residences. With more than 50,000 groomings per year, Pet Love keeps your cats and dogs beautiful and healthy!
It has been suggested that the most significant benefit would have been the use of dogs' robust sense of smell to assist with the hunt.[136] The relationship between the presence of a dog and success in the hunt is often mentioned as a primary reason for the domestication of the wolf, and a 2004 study of hunter groups with and without a dog gives quantitative support to the hypothesis that the benefits of cooperative hunting was an important factor in wolf domestication.[137]
Every year, between 6 and 8 million dogs and cats enter US animal shelters.[204] The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) estimates that approximately 3 to 4 million of those dogs and cats are euthanized yearly in the United States.[205] However, the percentage of dogs in US animal shelters that are eventually adopted and removed from the shelters by their new legal owners has increased since the mid-1990s from around 25% to a 2012 average of 40% among reporting shelters[206] (with many shelters reporting 60–75%).[207]
^ Bridgett M. von Holdt, Emily Shuldiner, Ilana Janowitz Koch, Rebecca Y. Kartzinel, Andrew Hogan, Lauren Brubaker, Shelby Wanser4, Daniel Stahler, Clive D.L. Wynne, Elaine A. Ostrander, Janet S. Sinsheimer and Monique A.R. Udell (19 July 2017). "Structural variants in genes associated with human Williams-Beuren syndrome underlie stereotypical hypersociability in domestic dogs". Science Advances. 3 (7): e1700398. Bibcode:2017SciA....3E0398V. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1700398. PMC 5517105. PMID 28776031.

The majority of contemporary dog owners describe their pet as part of the family,[146] although some ambivalence about the relationship is evident in the popular reconceptualization of the dog–human family as a pack.[146] A dominance model of dog–human relationships has been promoted by some dog trainers, such as on the television program Dog Whisperer. However it has been disputed that "trying to achieve status" is characteristic of dog–human interactions.[150] Pet dogs play an active role in family life; for example, a study of conversations in dog–human families showed how family members use the dog as a resource, talking to the dog, or talking through the dog, to mediate their interactions with each other.[151]


We continually review and update our pet grooming policies, procedures and standards, under the supervision of our Director of Veterinary Medicine, with counsel from a number of independent experts in animal care, behavior and ethics. We continue to train our teams on and reinforce the critical importance of following those policies at all times. Since 2015, we've worked together with the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) and the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance (PPGSA) to encourage and support national health and safety standards for the grooming industry. We believe these standards are critical to the wellbeing of pets everywhere, and we continue to work with other pet industry leaders to encourage industry-wide adoption and adherence to them.
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