Some breeds of dogs are prone to certain genetic ailments such as elbow and hip dysplasia, blindness, deafness, pulmonic stenosis, cleft palate, and trick knees. Two serious medical conditions particularly affecting dogs are pyometra, affecting unspayed females of all types and ages, and gastric dilatation volvulus (bloat), which affects the larger breeds or deep-chested dogs. Both of these are acute conditions, and can kill rapidly. Dogs are also susceptible to parasites such as fleas, ticks, mites, hookworms, tapeworms, roundworms, and heartworms (roundworm species that lives in the heart of dogs).

Long fur on the paws acts as a trap for grass seeds, grit, or even ice, so regular trimming is advisable. Use a pair of curved scissors with rounded tips. Work on one toe at a time and twirl the fur growing between two toes between your finger and thumb, and then snip the hair off at the base. Be careful never to pull on the fur, which elevates the skin and makes cutting it more likely. If you cannot see where the skin ends and the fur starts, then slide a comb through the fur at skin level, and using the scissors cut on the safe side of the comb. Repeat for each toe on each paw.


Despite their close genetic relationship and the ability to inter-breed, there are a number of diagnostic features to distinguish the gray wolves from domestic dogs. Domesticated dogs are clearly distinguishable from wolves by starch gel electrophoresis of red blood cell acid phosphatase.[41] The tympanic bullae are large, convex and almost spherical in gray wolves, while the bullae of dogs are smaller, compressed and slightly crumpled.[42] Compared with equally sized wolves, dogs tend to have 20% smaller skulls and 30% smaller brains.[43]:35 The teeth of gray wolves are also proportionately larger than those of dogs.[44] Dogs have a more domed forehead and a distinctive "stop" between forehead and nose.[45] The temporalis muscle that closes the jaws is more robust in wolves.[5]:p158 Wolves do not have dewclaws on their back legs, unless there has been admixture with dogs that had them.[46] Most dogs lack a functioning pre-caudal gland and enter estrus twice yearly, unlike gray wolves which only do so once a year.[47] So-called primitive dogs such as dingoes and Basenjis retain the yearly estrus cycle.[48]
"While new to thumbtack, we have over 20 years of experience, a 5 star rating online & we're reasonably priced! Background: Our founder grew up around street dogs, aggressive dogs, and so-called dangerous breeds. And has been around dogs for more than 20 years and understands them (and other animals) better than he understands people. His core values, which are apart of the company are: Value, Respect, Compassion, Integrity & Love We can help you train your pup, exercise them, housebreak them and teach you basic tactics to overcome their basic behavioral issues. We have experience with rottweilers, German shepherds, pit-bulls and other large breeds. I believe there are no bad dogs, just bad manners trained into them by accident. We love playing with them, roughhousing with them and teaching them things. Here is a free pro-tip; dogs love being scratched where they can't reach. The favorite location is the back of their hind legs, base of the spine on their back (in between the shoulder blades), & the base of the tail... BUT, you have to scratch very, very hard. Be forewarned, they will forever greet you with their rear facing you. :)"
In 1758, the Swedish botanist and zoologist Carl Linnaeus published in his Systema Naturae the binomial nomenclature – or the two-word naming – of species. Canis is the Latin word meaning "dog",[21] and under this genus he listed the dog-like carnivores including domestic dogs, wolves, and jackals. He classified the domestic dog as Canis familiaris, and on the next page he classified the wolf as Canis lupus.[3] Linnaeus considered the dog to be a separate species from the wolf because of its cauda recurvata - its upturning tail which is not found in any other canid.[22]
"The most widespread form of interspecies bonding occurs between humans and dogs"[136] and the keeping of dogs as companions, particularly by elites, has a long history.[142] (As a possible example, at the Natufian culture site of Ain Mallaha in Israel, dated to 12,000 BC, the remains of an elderly human and a four-to-five-month-old puppy were found buried together).[22] However, pet dog populations grew significantly after World War II as suburbanization increased.[142] In the 1950s and 1960s, dogs were kept outside more often than they tend to be today[143] (using the expression "in the doghouse" to describe exclusion from the group signifies the distance between the doghouse and the home) and were still primarily functional, acting as a guard, children's playmate, or walking companion. From the 1980s, there have been changes in the role of the pet dog, such as the increased role of dogs in the emotional support of their human guardians.[144] People and dogs have become increasingly integrated and implicated in each other's lives,[145] to the point where pet dogs actively shape the way a family and home are experienced.[146]
Clear the dog's eyes. White-haired breeds or those with large eyes that water a lot (Pekingese, Pugs, Pomeranians, etc.) may need more maintenance in this area than others. Depending on your particular dog, this step may be a simple matter of wiping or pulling eye debris away from the corners of the eyes. Long-haired or white-haired dogs may need special attention to make sure that all gunk is out of the coat, as they may get tear stains. You can buy products made for removing "tear stains" from a white coat at a pet supply store.
Dogs generally have brown eyes and wolves almost always have amber or light colored eyes.[49] The skin of domestic dogs tends to be thicker than that of wolves, with some Inuit tribes favoring the former for use as clothing due to its greater resistance to wear and tear in harsh weather.[50] The paws of a dog are half the size of those of a wolf, and their tails tend to curl upwards, another trait not found in wolves.[51] The dog has developed into hundreds of varied breeds, and shows more behavioral and morphological variation than any other land mammal.[52]
Dogs have been described as carnivores[117][118] or omnivores.[17][119][120][121] Compared to wolves, dogs have genes involved in starch digestion that contribute to an increased ability to thrive on a starch-rich diet.[19] Based on metabolism and nutrition, many consider the dog to be an omnivore. However, the dog is not simply an omnivore. More like the cat and less like other omnivores, the dog can only produce bile acid with taurine, and it cannot produce vitamin D, which it obtains from animal flesh. Also more like the cat, the dog requires arginine to maintain its nitrogen balance. These nutritional requirements place the dog part-way between carnivores and omnivores.[122]
We do everything from sophisticated show trims. To low maintenance haircuts. The DFW areas only multiple Best in Show winning groomer. Winning specialties in Giant Schnauzers, Bichon Frises, Poodles and Collies. We do not give price quotes nor make appointments via the internet. Please call the shop during regular business hours to make appointments or discuss pricing. Thank you.
Dog grooming is so much more than giving your dog a bath. Dog grooming is a broad term that covers all aspects of canine cleanliness and hygiene. The services included in dog grooming will vary based on your needs and what you choose to pay. Unless they are rolling in cowpies or playing in mud puddles, most dogs are okay getting a shampoo bath only as needed. You’ll know when they need it if they smell bad or are bringing dirt into the house. Some dogs, like shepherds and shih tzus, have thick coats that can get matted and tangled without regular care. Pro dog groomers can deftly blow dry a dog’s hair after a bath so that it is shiny and smooth. Dog grooming can include brushing that detangles dog hair and also thins the undercoat to minimize shedding.

Full-service grooming cost is based on breed, pet size and type of fur or hair. It will be confirmed for you when you meet your stylist at the start of your service, and a standardized rate card based on location is available at your salon. Your stylist will consult with you before each appointment to create a personalized plan that you and your pet will be happy with!
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