In addition, people with pet dogs took considerably more physical exercise than those with cats and those without pets. The results provide evidence that keeping pets may have positive effects on human health and behaviour, and that for guardians of dogs these effects are relatively long-term.[195] Pet guardianship has also been associated with increased coronary artery disease survival, with human guardians being significantly less likely to die within one year of an acute myocardial infarction than those who did not own dogs.[196]
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
Dog meat is consumed in some East Asian countries, including Korea, China[133] and Vietnam,[134] a practice that dates back to antiquity.[164] It is estimated that 13–16 million dogs are killed and consumed in Asia every year.[165] In China, debates have ensued over banning the consumption of dog meat.[166] Following the Sui and Tang dynasties of the first millennium, however, people living on the plains of northern China began to eschew eating dogs. This is likely due to the spread of Buddhism and Islam, two religions that forbade the consumption of certain animals, including dogs. As members of the upper classes shunned dog meat, it gradually became a social taboo to eat it, despite the fact that the general population continued to consume it for centuries afterward.[167] Other cultures, such as Polynesia and pre-Columbian Mexico, also consumed dog meat in their history. However, Western, South Asian, African, and Middle Eastern cultures, in general, regard consumption of dog meat as taboo. In some places, however, such as in rural areas of Poland, dog fat is believed to have medicinal properties – being good for the lungs for instance.[168] Dog meat is also consumed in some parts of Switzerland.[169] Proponents of eating dog meat have argued that placing a distinction between livestock and dogs is western hypocrisy, and that there is no difference with eating the meat of different animals.[170][171][172][173]
Raised grooming tables and bath tubs keep you from bending your back and hurting yourself. Any table or sturdy surface could serve as a makeshift grooming table, but always have a non-skid surface for the dog to stand on. That means no wheels on the table. Hardware stores usually carry rubber-backed or rubber runners sold by the yard that you can cut to size of any surface.
Show Stopping Style grooms dogs and cats in your home. I can kindly introduce puppies and kittens to brushing, clipping, blow drying, and having their nails done! They feel more secure staying home, and pet parents can be right there! I grind dog and puppy nails to avoid splintering and to make soft paws, and use gentle, all natural, species appropriate shampoo and ear cleaner. If you'd rather I take your pet to a nearby facility, only the cost of the facility will be extra. ... View Profile

Dog meat is consumed in some East Asian countries, including Korea, China[133] and Vietnam,[134] a practice that dates back to antiquity.[164] It is estimated that 13–16 million dogs are killed and consumed in Asia every year.[165] In China, debates have ensued over banning the consumption of dog meat.[166] Following the Sui and Tang dynasties of the first millennium, however, people living on the plains of northern China began to eschew eating dogs. This is likely due to the spread of Buddhism and Islam, two religions that forbade the consumption of certain animals, including dogs. As members of the upper classes shunned dog meat, it gradually became a social taboo to eat it, despite the fact that the general population continued to consume it for centuries afterward.[167] Other cultures, such as Polynesia and pre-Columbian Mexico, also consumed dog meat in their history. However, Western, South Asian, African, and Middle Eastern cultures, in general, regard consumption of dog meat as taboo. In some places, however, such as in rural areas of Poland, dog fat is believed to have medicinal properties – being good for the lungs for instance.[168] Dog meat is also consumed in some parts of Switzerland.[169] Proponents of eating dog meat have argued that placing a distinction between livestock and dogs is western hypocrisy, and that there is no difference with eating the meat of different animals.[170][171][172][173]
In addition, people with pet dogs took considerably more physical exercise than those with cats and those without pets. The results provide evidence that keeping pets may have positive effects on human health and behaviour, and that for guardians of dogs these effects are relatively long-term.[195] Pet guardianship has also been associated with increased coronary artery disease survival, with human guardians being significantly less likely to die within one year of an acute myocardial infarction than those who did not own dogs.[196]
A Colorado study found bites in children were less severe than bites in adults.[179] The incidence of dog bites in the US is 12.9 per 10,000 inhabitants, but for boys aged 5 to 9, the incidence rate is 60.7 per 10,000. Moreover, children have a much higher chance to be bitten in the face or neck.[180] Sharp claws with powerful muscles behind them can lacerate flesh in a scratch that can lead to serious infections.[181]
We continually review and update our pet grooming policies, procedures and standards, under the supervision of our Director of Veterinary Medicine, with counsel from a number of independent experts in animal care, behavior and ethics. We continue to train our teams on and reinforce the critical importance of following those policies at all times. Since 2015, we've worked together with the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) and the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance (PPGSA) to encourage and support national health and safety standards for the grooming industry. We believe these standards are critical to the wellbeing of pets everywhere, and we continue to work with other pet industry leaders to encourage industry-wide adoption and adherence to them.
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